Get Out (2017) Film Review

Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) is being taken by his girlfriend Rose (Allison Williams) back home to her folks place, a sprawling estate next to a forest in a very wealthy part of the world.  He’s black and is quite concerned about how the family will react to their daughter’s new black boyfriend. It’s ok though – Dad (Bradley Whitford) would have voted for Obama for a third term. Mum’s a psychologist (Catherine Keener) and bro Jeremy (Caleb Landry Jones) is a bit of a freak, but surely it’s ok? Oh, no. That’s when you need to remember that this is a horror film and things just are not going to be that straightforward.

It’s been talked about as a film where the horror is being a young black man surrounded by well-meaning white folks, and that’s pretty reductive. Yes, there is a lot of fish-out-of-water humour, but there’s a lot more to it than that. I only really discovered Key and Peele over the last year or two (I’d suggest if you have not seen the show, get onto it. It’s hilarious, often also very clever, and all on Netflix. Get Out is by Jordan Peele, and thus it’s funny and clever. Get onto it – and don’t stress out too much by the horror side. You’ll only scream a few times.

 

Girls (TV Review)

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Hannah (Lena Dunham) lives in Brooklyn with her best mate, Marnie (Allison Williams). She is intending to be a writer, but since her parents cut her off, she is having to work. Meanwhile, she and her hipster mates are exploring their lives and limits.

 

In case I’ve never made it clear, I love hipsters. I’m not one because I think I’m far too old to be throwing my hat in with a bunch of early twenties cool folks, but I admire from a distance. I don’t know if you could enjoy this show if you hate hipsters; I think Lena Dunham’s extremely clever wit and insight into the characters is by far enough to carry the show, but I can imagine hipster-haters just rolling their eyes as they reach for the remote.

 

Enough people must think like me, as Girls has become a huge success, winning critical and popular acclaim and Golden Globes.