Tag Archives: Book Review

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman – Book Review

As an adult, a man returns to his childhood home and recalls a story which is so magical, so mysterious, so strange that it couldn’t possibly be true. I don’t want to recall any more of the plot here because I knew nothing going in and absolutely loved not knowing anything, and just taking the mysterious journey.

I listened to this as an audio book, read by Neil Gaiman, which I just loved. I’ve heard Gaiman on podcasts and in interviews, and listening to him read this story took me totally into this world. It felt real, and yet so unreal. I could listen to him all day.  Having only recently read any of his works, I’m loving it.

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this is not my beautiful life by Elly Varrenti – Book Review

It’s really strange to read an autobiography of someone I don’t know… I don’t believe I know who Elly Varrenti is, but it didn’t matter. I really enjoyed her writing, her humour, her candidness about herself and her family, motherhood, past loves and lovers. It a great read – familiar, yet unique.

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The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows – Book Review

The story of how this book came to be is almost as adorable as the book itself. Mary Ann Shaffer was a former librarian who was once accidentally stranded on Guernsey and read all about the German occupation of the island in the WW2. Many years later, she decided to write a novel, and wrote this. Unfortunately, she was quite old at this stage and not very well, and so her niece, Annie Barrows, an author, took over the story. Shaffer passed away before it was published, so terribly sad.

The book is written as a series of letters which tell the story of Juliet Ashton in 1946. Juliet wrote a column during the war which was intended to keep spirits up for the British during the dark years of the war. Now that it’s over, she’s looking for a new project and ended up in correspondence with many residents of Guernsey who formed a book club during the occupation.

It’s a delightfully written book with wonderful characters and the letters are so charming to read. I particularly enjoyed the way it told so much about what happened during the war in a very casual, conversational way. You’ve got to love a book that leaves you wanting to go and live in that world for a while, and for me, this is absolutely one of those books.

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Life After Life by Kate Atkinson – Book Review

Imagine if, when you died, you were born again, and were able to make different choices, or take different paths. This is what happens to Ursula Todd, born in England in 1910. This book covers two wars and so much more.

I really loved reading this book – the chance to have one character live so many different lives, and I’ve always loved stories of the Blitz. It’s a fascinating journey and really too much fun. I now need to get my hands on A God in Ruins, which Atkinson’s book following the younger brother of Ursula.

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MaddAddam Trilogy by Margaret Atwood – Audio Book Review

Oryx and Crake narrated by John Chancer

The Year of the Flood narrated by Lorelei King

MaddAddam narrated by Bernadette Dunn, Bob Walter and Robbie Daymond

Ah, a Margaret Atwood dystopian future novel. There’s nothing like it. So, in this world, most people have been wiped out by a man-made virus. Over the course of these books, we learn about the people who were around in the lead-up to it, and when happened. There are also animals created by splicing species to get the best features of multiple animals into a single beast – a process taken to extremes.

Because of the way the trilogy is structured, with each book presenting different perspectives over time, it takes all three books to get a real impression of the world. By the end of the first, I felt that I knew what was happening, but then as I got into the next, I wanted to go back and check things. Here lies the problem with audio books – you can’t just flick through and re-read a single section.

I listened to these books over a few weeks and couldn’t get the world out of my head. Now, a few weeks later, I still can’t decide if I liked them or not. There were aspects that I really loved, like the way Atwood wrote how our consumer-based lifestyle could end up. But then other parts that didn’t work for me – they were too much or just not right. I don’t know – I liked it, but I’m not sure that I would necessarily recommend it.

 

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Inappropriation by Lexi Freiman – Book Review

Ziggy is in Year Ten at a very prestigious Sydney private school and she doesn’t fit in. Still trying to work out her identity, she makes friends with a couple of schoolmates who are critical of everything and are exploring ideology through extreme feminist and queer lenses. Ziggy is torn by their and her own contradictions and is not helped by her ridiculous psychologist mother.

I struggled with this book a lot. I can’t think of a single likable character, not just likable but relatable. I felt that some of this may relate to personal experience – perhaps being a Year 10 in 2018 in wealthy Sydney is just too far beyond my own experience. However, I couldn’t tell if the book is taking the piss out of ‘PC culture’ or if, by exploring it through the eyes of 15-year-old misfits shows the strengths and weaknesses in a different way. At any rate, I didn’t get a lot of what was going on, and overall, I just didn’t like it.

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Hate is Such a Strong Word by Sarah Ayoub – Book Review

Sophie is in Year 12 at a Lebanese, Catholic school. She is struggling with her identity, finding a balance between being a teenager in modern Sydney but having to live within the restrictions of her protective, traditional father. Meanwhile, with a recent violent clash similar to the Cronulla riots takes place, everyone is on edge. When a new student starts, he is ostracised because of his background.

Self-doubt. Love. Confusion. Peer pressure. Cultural pressure. Family pressure. Independence. Lies. Difficult truths. This book has it all. Ayoub brings us so quickly into this world where Sophie is trying to figure out what she wants and how to get it while still having the support and love of her friends and family. I loved it. Such a good YA book.

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